LCI microscopy course, vintage 2021 :)

The Live Cell imaging facility will run again its intensive light microscopy course in Jan-Feb 2021.

The schedule can be found here.

As usual, all lectures will be publicly broadcasted live. So if you think that a lecture could be useful for you, you are welcome to listen, without registration, by following this link.

Due to the current pandemics, only registered students will be allowed in the lecture room.

The course comprises lectures, workshops, imaging of your own sample, demos… It will run 26 Jan-12 Feb, 3 days/week (tues-thurs) 9:00-17:15.

There are only 16 spots. The course counts for 6 credit points.
The rest of the time (the course counts for 4 weeks) is used for home assignments. Mondays and Fridays will also be used for individual workshops where we image your own sample.

The application process is open now until the 16th of November. Please read carefully the eligibility criteria. You will need to sent me some images of your sample at the time of application. This course is only open to people who already have some experience of fluorescence microscopy.

Microscopy: improve your imaging skills – from sample preparation to image analysis

At the end of the course, the participants will be able to:
1- Describe the difference between wide field, confocal and light sheet microscopes as well as the different types of confocal microscopes and choose which system is most suited to their experiments
2- Pick the best combination of fluorophores for their experiment by matching their spectra with the microscope light source and filters, identify and eliminate bleed-through and cross-excitation problems
3- Explain objective specifications and limitations and choose the appropriate objective for their own experiments
4- Describe how to fix, mount and handle their sample in a way that is optimal for imaging
5- Find their sample and the area of interest without bleaching it
6- Adjust the condenser for proper DIC imaging (Koehlering)
7- Explain how to set the following parameters on a wide field, a confocal or a light sheet system to best match the requirements of their sample and reliably answer their scientific question: resolution, pixel size, averaging, scan speed, illumination power, detector gain and offset, camera readout rate, exposure time and camera binning
8- Explain which applications require a hardware or a software autofocus, a spectral detector, a resonance scanner, two-photon or super resolution microscopy
9- Explain the advantages in using the automation of a microscope system to collect multidimensional data
10- Explain how to deal with images before publication in scientific journals
11- Describe the imaging requirements for automated image analysis
12- Run an image analysis pipeline on freeware (ImageJ/FIJI, Cell Profiler) designed for their own images and scientific question.

Please spread the word to your colleagues.

We are looking forward to meeting you and your sample! 😃

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