Where to find microscopy jobs and wikis

Where to ask microscopy-related questions?

Image.sc and microlist
Post your microscopy, sample preparation and image analysis questions

Confocal server
Old email-based forum that is followed by tons of people across the globe as well as most microscopy companies. Post your microscopy and sample preparation questions.

Freeware for image analysis

Image J/Fiji
Great freeware to open images acquired on any microscope, resize, crop, change contrast, create movies, annotate, analyze and much more.

Cell Profiler
Freeware for automated image analysis including machine learning.

KNIME
Open source to build a custom made image analysis pipeline

Icy
Great freeware to open images acquired on any microscope, resize, crop, change contrast, create movies, annotate, analyze and much more.

Networks, jobs and career

Light microscopy jobs, meetings, courses, networking… in Europe. Remember to mail them that you want to show up on their map of European microscopy!

Loads of information from which companies/institute works with research to how to find an apartment when moving to another lab, find work, know your rights, express your opinion about researchers’ work conditions…

Other places to look for work:

Microscopy wikis

Kurt Thorn’s excellent microscopy blog
I highly recommend this blog even if it is not updated anymore. Monthly digest of major microscopy related articles. Loads of tips.

Microscopy Education by Nikon

Leica Science Lab

Microscopy Education by Olympus

Microscopy Education by ZEISS

Molecular Expressions

SVI deconvolution

Microscopy info

Nature Milestones Light Microscopy

iBiology Microscopy Course

Freeware to turn widefield, TIRF or confocal images into super resolution images!

Check out this webinar tomorrow by Rickardo Henriques, the inventor of SRRF (surf), post processing magic for all types of images!

*Title:* Open and accessible cutting-edge technology for  super-resolution and machine-learning enabled microscopy

*When: *June 5th 4:00 pm CEST

*How to access/register*

And here’s a small teaser if you want to quickly see the topics we’ll cover.

Neubias webinars on Youtube

Updates on the next events of the NEUBIAS Academy@Home Webinar series,

Newly confirmed events:

5 May: ilastik beyond pixel classification, by Anna Kreshuk and Dominik Kutra-

6 May: GPU-Accelerated Image Processing with CLIJ2, by Robert Haase

7 May: Interactive Bioimage Analysis with Python and Jupyter, by Guillaume Witz

Upcoming events open to registration:

LAST CHANCE TO REGISTER:

28 April: Introduction to nuclei segmentation with StarDist, by Martin Weigert et al

29 April: Quantitative Pathology and Bioimage Analysis: QuPath v0.2.0, By Pete Bankhead

30 April: Advanced Image Processing with MorphoLibJ, by David Legland

Two weeks after the opening of the Academy and of the registrations, Webinars and online courses have already attracted over 5,000 registrations!

The events are recorded and some are already available on the Youtube NEUBIAS Channel.

Furthermore, a thread will be opened in the image.sc Forum to report Q&As and to welcome further questions/comments for each event.

You’ll find more information here.

Neubias online school of image analysis

Neubias is back with new ideas! Neubias is the Network of European Bioimage Analysts and what they burn for is to help scientists analyze their images.

Possibly inspired by the Corona time, they will start an online school for image analysis based on video tutorials and online events.

Have a look at their new page called Neubias academy where they announce several events coming up in the next few months.

Broadcasted lectures from the LCI microscopy course and private demos of light sheet and cameras

Our course starts tomorrow! 😀

Target audience:

The aim for this course is to improve the microscopy skills of students and researchers who have already used a microscope to acquire digital images of fluorescent samples and want to improve their skills.

Registrations are closed but all lectures are open to everyone without registration.

  • The schedule and details of the venue are here.
  • All lectures are also available online live. The link and instructions to watch are here.
  • Make sure you check the schedule in case of last minutes changes.

If you are in Sweden, you are welcome to try some of the equipment on demo with your own sample.

To book at timeslot, please contact the responsible person directly.

  • Light sheet microscope from M2Lasers: Valentina Loschiavo Valentina.Loschiavo(at)m2lasers.com
    • Fast imaging of large sample
    • Overview function to navigate in the sample and find the region of interest
    • 800x800um field of view with 1um min resolution
    • Any immersion media
    • Sample size up to centimetres
  • Wide Field microscope from Nikon with 3 different Andor cameras: Oliver Garner (oliver.garner(at)bergmanlabora.se)
    • Nikon Ti2 microscope with 4 times larger field of view
    • A front illuminated sCMOS camera: Good sensitivity and resolution, great speed, but a greyish background (Andor Zyla 4.2)
    • A back-illuminated EM-CCD camera: highly sensitive camera with very dark background, but lower resolution and lower speed (Andor 897U)
    • A back-illuminated sCMOS camera: same sensitivity and low background as an EM-CCD but better resolution and speed (Andor Sona)

The antibody validation nightmare

Ever wondered if that antibody you used throughout your whole PhD was actually also binding to something else than its supposed target protein?

Antibody validation in tissue staining is a very difficult task!

Here is a great step-by-step validation protocol published by EuroMabNet, a network of scientists who try to improve antibody validation.

And this paper gives a useful flow chart for antibody validation.

And here is the 5 pillars of antibody validation paper which explains what can be done to validate antibodies.

 

Know your RRid!

Imagine starting a study about some cool protein.

You find some useful articles on Google Scholar. In one paper, an antibody is mentioned. The name of the company that sold it to the authors is mentioned in the Material and Method but unfortunately that company has closed down or has been swallowed by one of the Pharma giants so you cannot order. Then you realize that the company was not producing any antibodies anyway, they were buying it from another company so there is no way to trace and buy the same antibody. Nightmare…

Then imagine that instead, the paper mentions the RRid number for that antibody. You do not know about what that is but you check and find this paper that explains it all.

Now suddenly, not only you can find on the Scicrunch website which company produces this antibody and which resells it so you can buy it, but you can also search pubmed for the RRid and find all the articles that mention it, opening your eyes to lots of results about your protein that have been published specifically with using that antibody. Now you can also check if the antibody gives consistent results!

And imagine being to do this for your favorite mouse model as well. See all publications that have mentioned your mouse RRId!

But it relies on you writing the RRid of your antibody or mouse in your next publication so think about it! 😀

Great video Microcourses about microscopy

Jennifer Watson’s Microcourses channel on You Tube is really recommended to anyone who uses a microscope.

Short targetted videos that will boil down the principles of light microscopy for biologist and help you understand what you are doing.

There are a few series, each of them with a few videos and the collection is constantly growing. Remember to subscribe so you get to know when they post a new one.

New image analysis training school with Neubias

NEUBIAS, the Network of European BioImage Analysts, is delighted to announce two new Training Schools on BioImage Analysis:

TS14 for Early Career Investigators (Life Scientists: PhD candidates, Postdocs, Staff, …):

This training school will cover the basics of image analysis using ImageJ/Fiji, as well as image analysis workflow automation using ImageJ macro programming. In addition, it will be taught how to use the software package ilastik for machine learning based image segmentation and object classification, and how to integrate ilastik into ImageJ macro based workflows. Moreover, an overview of further relevant bioimage analysis software packages will be given and there will be ample time for “Work on Your Own Data” sessions assisted by experienced Analysts.

TS15 for BioImage Analysts (advanced level):

This school targets bioimage analysts, who are willing to enhance their professional scope and techniques for improving the quality of their analysis, at the same time as willing to contribute with their knowledge and experience to the school. Prerequisite is a proficiency in at least one programming language (we do not train coding). The school focuses on workflow designing. This year, we will have a particular emphasis on statistics for bioimage analysis and related tools e.g. R and Python libraries. In addition, we will overview machine & deep learning components.

The schools will be held in Bordeaux, Feb 29 – Mar 03 2019, hosted at the Centre Broca Nouvelle-Aquitaine by the Bordeaux Imaging Center (BIC) and the Interdisciplinary Institute for Neuroscience. The selected students will be able to attend the whole NEUBIAS conference as part of the training.

NEUBIAS schools are an excellent opportunity to learn from many experts in Bioimage Analysis (we are expecting >20 specialists at the event) and “…a great mix of intensive learning and community networking” (former trainee testimonial). All schools include practical sessions “Work on Your Own Data”, plenary seminars and a session on ethics in image analysis.

Applications are now open (TS14 = 25 seats, TS15 = 35 seats and ~10+ trainers per school). Within the COST framework (funders of NEUBIAS), we will offer up to 7 travel grants per school to applicants who qualify.

Application deadline: December 12th 2019 Selection notification: December 20th 2019

More information about schools (programme & trainers) and venue, travel & lodge available at our website:

eubias.org/NEUBIAS/training-schools/

eubias.org/NEUBIAS/training-schools/eci/ts14-bordeaux-2020/

eubias.org/NEUBIAS/training-schools/analysts/ts15-bordeaux-2020/

We kindly ask that you help us reach out to all potential interested applicants.

on behalf of all NEUBIAS members, local organizers (Florian Levet and Fabrice Cordelières), scientific organizers (Romain Guiet, Elnaz Fazeli, Christian Tischer, Kota Miura, Marion Louveaux), and NEUBIAS Training Leaders Gabriel Martins and Fabrice Cordelières.

Seminar on how to directly label your primary antibodies: Skip the secondary, part 3!

The LCI will host a seminar about GlyCLICK, a new way to directly label primary antibodies and stop using secondaries: 6th of November at 13:00 in the Lipid seminar room in Neo, KI Flemingsberg. The seminar will be broadcasted live. Here is how to find us and here how to follow the seminar online.

Everyone agrees that it would be great to be able to label our samples without using secondary antibodies.

  • less animals killed
  • shorter and cheaper protocols
  • no problem with isotype cross-reaction
  • no problem with secondary species when using many antibodies at once

There are many kits to label primary antibodies directly with fluorophores. The main disadvantage compared to primary/secondary stainings is that direct labels are often weaker because the final primary/fluorophore ratio is too low. Using an amplification method like TSA (Tyramide Signal Amplification) leads to a loss of resolution.

Over the years users at the LCI have tried this kit, this kit and this one. They gave mixed results depending on the antibody but we keep looking! Come to the LCI seminar about a new direct labelling technique that uses Click chemistry.