Broadcasted lectures from the LCI microscopy course and private demos of light sheet and cameras

Our course starts tomorrow! 😀

Target audience:

The aim for this course is to improve the microscopy skills of students and researchers who have already used a microscope to acquire digital images of fluorescent samples and want to improve their skills.

Registrations are closed but all lectures are open to everyone without registration.

  • The schedule and details of the venue are here.
  • All lectures are also available online live. The link and instructions to watch are here.
  • Make sure you check the schedule in case of last minutes changes.

If you are in Sweden, you are welcome to try some of the equipment on demo with your own sample.

To book at timeslot, please contact the responsible person directly.

  • Light sheet microscope from M2Lasers: Valentina Loschiavo Valentina.Loschiavo(at)m2lasers.com
    • Fast imaging of large sample
    • Overview function to navigate in the sample and find the region of interest
    • 800x800um field of view with 1um min resolution
    • Any immersion media
    • Sample size up to centimetres
  • Wide Field microscope from Nikon with 3 different Andor cameras: Oliver Garner (oliver.garner(at)bergmanlabora.se)
    • Nikon Ti2 microscope with 4 times larger field of view
    • A front illuminated sCMOS camera: Good sensitivity and resolution, great speed, but a greyish background (Andor Zyla 4.2)
    • A back-illuminated EM-CCD camera: highly sensitive camera with very dark background, but lower resolution and lower speed (Andor 897U)
    • A back-illuminated sCMOS camera: same sensitivity and low background as an EM-CCD but better resolution and speed (Andor Sona)

The antibody validation nightmare

Ever wondered if that antibody you used throughout your whole PhD was actually also binding to something else than its supposed target protein?

Antibody validation in tissue staining is a very difficult task!

Here is a great step-by-step validation protocol published by EuroMabNet, a network of scientists who try to improve antibody validation.

And this paper gives a useful flow chart for antibody validation.

And here is the 5 pillars of antibody validation paper which explains what can be done to validate antibodies.

 

Know your RRid!

Imagine starting a study about some cool protein.

You find some useful articles on Google Scholar. In one paper, an antibody is mentioned. The name of the company that sold it to the authors is mentioned in the Material and Method but unfortunately that company has closed down or has been swallowed by one of the Pharma giants so you cannot order. Then you realize that the company was not producing any antibodies anyway, they were buying it from another company so there is no way to trace and buy the same antibody. Nightmare…

Then imagine that instead, the paper mentions the RRid number for that antibody. You do not know about what that is but you check and find this paper that explains it all.

Now suddenly, not only you can find on the Scicrunch website which company produces this antibody and which resells it so you can buy it, but you can also search pubmed for the RRid and find all the articles that mention it, opening your eyes to lots of results about your protein that have been published specifically with using that antibody. Now you can also check if the antibody gives consistent results!

And imagine being to do this for your favorite mouse model as well. See all publications that have mentioned your mouse RRId!

But it relies on you writing the RRid of your antibody or mouse in your next publication so think about it! 😀

Transfecting hard-to-transfect cells

Here you can see a nice film of a beating cardiomyocyte.

It was transfected using Fuse-it vesicles full of the mRNA of LifeAct-tagGFP2. According to Ibidi, it also work well with primary cells which are typically difficult to transfect.

RNA-based transfection seems to be gaining speed compared to classical transfections using DNA.

If you try it, leave some comments here to tell us how it worked for you! 🙂

Great video Microcourses about microscopy

Jennifer Watson’s Microcourses channel on You Tube is really recommended to anyone who uses a microscope.

Short targetted videos that will boil down the principles of light microscopy for biologist and help you understand what you are doing.

There are a few series, each of them with a few videos and the collection is constantly growing. Remember to subscribe so you get to know when they post a new one.